In Depth 2016 election

Published on March 6th, 2017 | by Daniel Castro

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Reports of the Death of Big Data Have Been Greatly Exaggerated

Can we still trust data? Following a series of surprising election results in 2016 that defied the predictions made by some of the world’s most talented pollsters, some critics seem to think the answer is a resounding no. But while those who forecast elections certainly made mistakes, these failures do not mean that other uses of predictive analytics should be discarded. To the contrary, a close look at U.S. presidential election predictions shows that more investment in data, not less, is the way to avoid replicating these types of problems in the future.

Read the full article in Government Technology

Image: Ali Zifan and Inqvisitor

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About the Author

Daniel Castro is the director of the Center for Data Innovation and vice president of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation. Mr. Castro writes and speaks on a variety of issues related to information technology and internet policy, including data, privacy, security, intellectual property, internet governance, e-government, and accessibility for people with disabilities. His work has been quoted and cited in numerous media outlets, including The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, NPR, USA Today, Bloomberg News, and Businessweek. In 2013, Mr. Castro was named to FedScoop’s list of “Top 25 most influential people under 40 in government and tech.” In 2015, U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker appointed Mr. Castro to the Commerce Data Advisory Council.Mr. Castro previously worked as an IT analyst at the Government Accountability Office (GAO) where he audited IT security and management controls at various government agencies. He contributed to GAO reports on the state of information security at a variety of federal agencies, including the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). In addition, Mr. Castro was a Visiting Scientist at the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania where he developed virtual training simulations to provide clients with hands-on training of the latest information security tools. He has a B.S. in Foreign Service from Georgetown University and an M.S. in Information Security Technology and Management from Carnegie Mellon University.



One Response to Reports of the Death of Big Data Have Been Greatly Exaggerated

  1. Need to standardize data using nationally recognized standard terminology within EHRs, quality measure reporting and more clinically discrete reporting. If this is not done ,what happens is “garbage in is garbage out”. Big data can be saved if we standardize the data and the collection methods.

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