Data Visualization A visualization of global carbon dioxide levels.

Published on November 25th, 2014 | by Travis Korte

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One Year of Carbon Dioxide in Earth’s Atmosphere

Climate scientists at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center have created a visualization showing one year of carbon dioxide levels around the world. The visualization, created by a climate model running on a supercomputer, shows how the annual dynamics of carbon emissions are centered around major urban areas in North America, Europe, and Asia. During the summer, the colors start to fade as plants absorb larger quantities of carbon dioxide, while at the same time, fires in the southern hemisphere release carbon monoxide, an even more harmful chemical.

NASA hopes the scientific community will use the models that produced the visualization to simulate other particles’ movements around the globe. The visualization is based on data obtained by monitors on the ground, but in the future NASA’s OCO-2 climate monitoring satellite will augment the data set with more than 100,000 measurements each day.

Take a look.

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About the Author

Travis Korte is a research analyst at the Center for Data Innovation specializing in data science applications and open data. He has a background in journalism, computer science and statistics. Prior to joining the Center for Data Innovation, he launched the Science vertical of The Huffington Post and served as its Associate Editor, covering a wide range of science and technology topics. He has worked on data science projects with HuffPost and other organizations. Before this, he graduated with highest honors from the University of California, Berkeley, having studied critical theory and completed coursework in computer science and economics. His research interests are in computational social science and using data to engage with complex social systems. You can follow him on Twitter @traviskorte.



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